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women in fashion share their ideas

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Columbine
Smille

Stylist represented by LundLund Agency. Fashion Director at Styleby Magazine. Based in Stockholm, working world wide.

Affection

Credits

Helena Severin shot by Emma Tempest and styled by Dianna Lunt for Russh Magazine. Loving this.

Self Service archive

Devon Aoki on the cover for Self Service N°6. Shot by Inez Van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. Image found here.

EVENING SUN

Knit borrowed from Lisa, pants from Zara, shoes from Balenciaga, bag from Stella McCartney.

BREAKFAST WITH CHANEL

So, we’ve already started talking about the fall collections and as I’m currently working with the new season I thought it was about time to share more of the highlights from the season ahead.
Back in February I was invited to see the Chanel show, which was located at Brasserie Gabrielle (well, not really, it was at Grand Palais as usual but this time Mr Lagerfeld had his mind set on making this magnificant space into a French brasserie). It was impossible not beeing struck by the huge amount of time and effort that was put into every little detail. For example, the floor looked as it was made of beautiful special made tile, the waitors working at the bar invited you (well, all of the the spectators) to sit down for a coffe accompanied by mini pain au chocolates and crossiants. And, the catwalk was not your ordinary catwalk, it was the seating area of the restaurant. I already knew Chanel takes it all the way when doing a show but this was something extra special, it wasn’t only a show, it was the world of Chanel.

So, how about the collection? I think Chanel is one of those brands which always maintains it’s true DNA but still keeps it fresh and interesting with new, unexpected takes. It’s always classic beacuse, well, it’s Chanel. But in some way, Karl Lagerfeld always seems to reinvent the classics in the most fascinating ways. For me, this collection is one of the strongest one made in a while. As you would expect from a fall collection from Chanel there was a lot tweed going on. And by that I mean a LOT. That might make you yawn but there was nothing tired about it, I promise. Bags looked like plates and skirts like piles of napkins. Mr Lagerfeld, as the staff working at Chanel calls him, is not afraid of playing around, that’s for sure. What really got my attention though was the more futuristic pieces. Some of the first all black and white looks were simply amazing, the suit of skirt and jacket made of crinkled and knotted leather almost looked like it was made out of garbage bags (and I mean this in the best way possible, I really do, the way those pieces were executed..my, oh my). That bag from the very same look..well, I wouldn’t say no to that. Yes, I’m saving up money as we speak. Not that you asked but anyway.
Also, the black bomber constructed in the same way must have been my favourite piece from the whole collection. Take a look a my favourite looks as well as some private photos of mine below. Curious to see more? Then you’re going to find a real treat in the next issue of STYLEBY, so stay tuned.

1

Kendall Jenner wearing my favourite look. Now, isn’t this just the bomb!?

2

Antonina Petkovic making me think Holy shit, headband might be something for me after all!

3

Napkins for fall, ladies!

4

The bomber of my dreams.

5

Sophisticated coolness. Right!?

6

An all white dream.

Alyson Shotz

I absolutely love the work by Brooklyn-based artist Alyson Shotz and recently I got the chance to take a closer look at one of her pieces when visiting the Frieze Art Fair.
Her works are very much about force of nature, physics and optics. I’m specifically fascinated by the series called Laws of Motion (as I’ve featured before in one of my moodboards, remember?), four different pieces cast from slabs of clay dropped from different heights with varying degrees of force. A process which, as written about here, relies on chance and allows each unique work to be shaped by gravity and motion. Once cast in bronze the undefined shapes become solified. I’m very drawn to this sort of art. Some sort of movement; moments that are solified, fixed. Makes me think of frustration, which is a feeling I keep coming back to as an inspiration for most of my ideas in my work. Because, you see, frustration is that force of feelings and volition wanting to come out but is incapable of doing so. You find yourself restless without knowing what to do, something needs to break to release that energy. It is a wish for movement which is fixed, stuck. One could say it’s a disinclination against fitting into a certain structure, the one expected from you.  But it’s also about playing with contrasts… communicating movement with something solified and fixed and using natural as well as artificial elements to do so.
I’m not saying that all of this is what Alyson Shotz wants to say with her art but for me, this is very much what I see in her work and that’s the beauty of it, isn’t it? It’s what YOU see, what your perception is that speaks to you, your reflection. You don’t need to be an expert to be entitled to your own opinions and perceptions.

For the very same reason  I love Richard Deacon’s “Restless” piece of wood steamed into a range of twisting forms. Ok, a little bit of topic, won’t go on forever about this. What I really wanted to say is that, if you’d want to see more of Alyson Shotz work you’d be able to do so in Stockholm at Galleri Andersson/Sandström from August 20th. I will definitely go.

“My Living Room Rug in Hyperbolic Space”, 2007.

“White fold”, 2014.

“Allusion of Gravity”, 2005.

“Laws of Motion” #1, 2 3 4.

“Recumbent folds”, 2012-2014.

From the series “Laws of Motion”.

STYLEBY MOOD BOARD

Take part of my monthly moodboard in the latest issue of STYLEBY, which is all about mermaids and the world beneath water, something that has always fascinated me.

I must be a mermaid I have no fear of depths, and a great fear of shallow living

The quote by Anais Nin was sent to me by sms from a close friend of mine. I’ve always been drawn to the underwater world, and the fascination for mermaids has followed me since childhood. For me, she symbolizes the collision of two worlds – of course, the world over and under water but it’s really something much more than that. This mythical figure found in fairy tales and the art world, stands over land borders, religion and culture. She is both real and fiction, not human nor animal -she is a being with magical powers. She is a woman.