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A digital atelier where inspirational
women in fashion share their ideas

Defining moments

Invited inspirational women share three images that have stuck on their mind – and become defining moments.

Defining moments

Sharp ladies share their three favorite images.

Monika Tatalovic is a stylist and art director based in London. Find her here.

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“Faig Ahmed is an artist doing brilliant things with carpets. He takes traditional Azerbaijani rugs, un-weaves them, and reconstructs them to create new patterns and shapes. His work is remarkable and something I find incredibly relateable as I practice this in my own craft. The process of taking a look created and curated by the designer, deconstructing it, and re-imagining it in my own way. A re-imagined extention of it’s original state – that’s the beauty of it.”

Faig Ahmed, Impossible viscosity, 2012. Found here.

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“This photo represents so many incredible relationships and opportunities I’ve come across recently. It was taken by my best friend Sarah Blais, who I live, play and work with. Her and I started working together a couple years ago and since have become the tightest work/life duo. Through our relationship, I started working with this brand, Beaufille, which sparked my involvement in consulting work. This was the collection that essentially launched my career. The designers are, today, some of my closest friends.”

Beaufille Fall 2016. Found here.

3

“This photo was taken by Jack Davison for Luncheon Magazine. The special moments in this fashion editorial are the quirky faces created through the set design by the incredible Rachel Thomas.  I have always taken an interest in every aspect of a photoshoot, not just the fashion, and so I try to involve myself in every step of the process. I have a deep respect for set designers and this one in particular created fucking art, man.”

Photo by Jack Davison. Found here.

Defining moments

Sharp ladies share their three favorite images.

Frida Marklund is a photographer based in Stockholm. Find her here.

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“This picture makes me so happy and brings back a lot of good memories from my time in new york. Its shot by Cass Bird, another photographer who’s work I appreciate for being relaxed, real and fun”

Photo by Cass Bird. Found here.

2

“This image ”Blondey”is shot by brittish fashion photographer Alasdair McLellan and its a portrait in collaboration with Palace Skateboards. His work is very simple, consistent and to me he also has this thing for youth and nostalgia. I just recently bought this print to put it up on our walls at home because Ive followed his work for a very long time and its something about it that makes me feel good and makes me coming back to it”

Photo by Alasdair McLellan. Photo found here.

3

“I am a nostalgic person and Ive always had a fascination of adolescence and subcultures. That time between puberty and the precipice of adulthood that for many is filled with a search of affiliation. During the 70s and 80s photographer and art teacher Joseph Szabo shot this and many more fantastic images of his students and I think its a beautiful project about youth, love, intimacy and confusion. It reminds me of why I got into photography from the start.”

Photo by Joseph Szabo. Found here.

Defining moments

Sharp ladies share their three favorite images.

Camille Charriére is a creative consultant based in London. Find her here.

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Source unknown

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Unknown photo. Found here.

3

Unknown photo. Found here.

“I still find it both incredibly frustrating but also perplexing that Instragram continues to enforce such a harsh censhorship policy when it comes to body parts, especially nipples. Given that society uses our female bodies to sell virtually anything nowadays, and X-rated nudity (read: a sex tape) is the key to overnight success, it seems ironic that anyone maintain such a “conservative” policy, let alone an app which is the number one reflection of our time. Though completely different, these three pictures could have been taken by the same woman: a woman who is confident in her own sexuality but not gratuitously so. I love the contrast between that tonal, super-sexualised peach shot that reveals nothing but says all (including that cheeky emoji I so love to use and abuse), the fashion statement shot, where every inch of skin is hidden yet so anchored in the now (hello Vetements vibes) and the naked shot, almost the 2016 version of Gainsbourg burning that 500 francs note live on French TV. #FreeTheNipple

Defining moments

Sharp ladies share their three favorite images.

Donnika Anderson is a model and contributor to Superhero mag based in London. Find her here.

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“I’m obsessed with Ib Kamara’s work. I’ve been following him for a long time and I think this was one of the first pictures I saw of his styling (and photography). In many African countries it is still illegal to be gay and since him and the model, Peter, are originally from Africa, I see this collaboration as a beautiful and significant response to that legality. Moreover, we see a lot of depictions of and work by the African diaspora in the Western world but I love seeing people who were actually born in Africa /have lived there doing big creative things! I also get inspired by this picture because Peter is from Zimbabwe which is right next to where my mum is from (Zambia – they used to be the same country) and it’s so amazing to see someone depicting that side of my heritage in such an interesting and genuine way.”

Photograph by Ib Kamara. Found here.

2

“I first saw this picture on the cover of Ed Phillip’s zine Southern Comfort. It was the first day I met him and the first photograph of his I had ever seen and it instantly made me fall for him as, having grown up in a suburban neighbourhood, I love suburban sunsets and loved that he seemed to have an eye for the same thing. Flicking through the rest of his zine, his use of natural light was so dreamy and emphatic, I couldn’t help but like him more and more. He’s now my boyfriend and I’m madly in love with him so I love this picture because it’s kind of where it all started for me.”

Photograph by Ed Phillips. Found here.

3

“My mum always tells me stories of when she was young in Zambia in the 1970’s and how much her and her friends used to love dressing up and partying and dancing. It was a while before I saw any pictorial evidence so when I saw this I fell in love with it immediately! It’s my mum dancing with her cousin John and her best friend (who I’ve grown up with as my Auntie) dancing in the background. I love how elegant and beautiful they look and that everyone is properly dancing – unlike nowadays when people prefer to stand around and look cool haha. I also think it’s really strange to think of your parents before you and when they were your age so I love seeing this picture of my mum doing the same things I do now in her own way and dress sense. She’s my main life inspiration!”

Defining moments

Sharp ladies share their three favorite images.

Greta Gram is a fashion designer based in Stockholm. Find her here.

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“During my fashion studies I came across the work of Cindy Sherman. I was intrigued by her way of portraying her women. It made me start working with art performances and later to use it in my design process. I could identify myself with the raw and authentic mood in her images.”

Cindy Sherman – Untitled #129, 1983. Found here.

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“An image from the first collection I made for my own brand. I love what this picture is representing to me. That I could believe in myself enough was a personal victory. The model Carmen is a friend of mine and a very cool woman. She has a PhD in underwater archeology(!) diving all over the world. Photographed by Agnes Lloyd-Platt.”

Greta Gram SS16 by Agnes Lloyd-Platt. Found here.

3

“I admire Yoko Ono for her art and for her cause to make the world more equal. In this work called cut piece she asked the viewers to cut away pieces of her clothing as she sat quietly on stage. By doing that she wanted to confront issues of gender, class, and cultural identity. Her art has meant a lot to me and my work. In 2012 I had the pleasure to meet her and present my work to her.”

Yoko Ono’s performance Cut Piece (1964). Found here.

Defining moments

Sharp ladies share their three favorite images.

Ann-Sofie Back is a fashion designer based in Stockholm. Find her here.

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“OK, so since I’m me I have to have failure as a defining moment. There are so many so it’s difficult to choose. But let’s say AW05 collection is my favorite failure.
It has a really un-catchy theme and it’s not even half finished, it’s still on the research stage but I still sent it out on the catwalk. The casting is awful. I hate it. And therefore I quite like it. It’s so embarrassing. The inspiration comes from the kind of “dress for success” books that were around in the 80s with texts like “what to wear” if you get invited to a hunting day at some great estate or how you can never go wrong with a little black dress. Like that’s ever going to happen to the people actually buying the book. I like the theme but it’s a hard sell.”

 

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“In 1998 Self Service Magazine put me in contact with photographer Anders Edström, we were both based in London and Swedes so they thought we should do a fashion editorial together for them. His images are a bit like watching paint dry, he catches the non-moments.
We met up and it was a painfully awkward but we have worked together ever since. We share a sense of complete embarrassment for working in fashion which made us do some really great/crappy stories in Dazed and Confused and Self Service. Every time we submitted a story we were completely sure they weren’t going to publish, but they did and we laughed our heads off because our work was so shit.”

 

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“When I studied at St Martin’s I read The Face rigorously but it wasn’t until I saw the styling of Anna Cockburn I knew what I wanted to do with my own design. The D.I.Y, cheap clothes and bland casting really stood out from everything else and was something I could identify with. The best story was called “Mr Potatoe Man” but this was “before” internet so I can’t find it. The photographer is David Sims”