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A digital atelier where inspirational
women in fashion share their ideas

The women

Intimate interviews with women who inspire us, styled by Space Matters’ editor Nike Felldin.

Dreams with Laerke

What’s on your mind right now:
Sleep, work and love.

Who’s visual expression makes you feel overwhelmed?
I’m obsessed by the photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia at the moment. His choice of colours, scenery and ability to show fragility really amazes me. One day I wanna make a film that has that essence that he so beautifully possesses.

What do you dream about?
Right now I’m mostly dreaming about beaches, palm trees and having a really good margarita with my boyfriend. Sometimes I also dream about how my life would be when I’m 80. Looking back at my life with my man and laughing of all the crazy experiences we’ve had with friends and colleagues wearing a perfect Chanel suit.

Who would you would love to work with?
I would LOVE to work with Alicia Vikander, Tilda Swinton and Meryl Streep (of course). They are some of my favourite actresses and it would be a pleasure to one day be on a shoot with one of them or even better to have them all in one film.

What’s your preferred space?
I treasure sleep so much so I will probably have to say that my bed is my preferred space. I just bought a new one and I miss it so much now when I’m abroad and working. When I’m not working I love to stay in my bed watching movies all day and catching up on my sleep.

Do you feel a sense of belonging in your field as a creative? How?
I can’t do anything else than film. It’s how I define myself, it’s where my mind is and were my thoughts are. Constantly and never ending.

What makes you excited about work?
Seeing my vision comes to live.

What’s the biggest risk of your life?
One of my biggest risks was when I moved from Copenhagen to Stockholm to approach my directorial career. My Swedish wasn’t really that good and I had no money in the bank. The first 6 months I lived on my best friends couches and walked through snow and rain cause I didn’t have any money to take the tube. It was completely worth it, but that first year definitely made we reconsider my choice.

Laerke Hertoni is a director, follow her here.
Photographed by Kimberly Ihre.

Dreams with Alexandra

What do you dream about?
Free lands and open calls.

What’s the biggest risk of your life?
To keep hope and dare to jump.

What’s on your mind right now:
To Live and Live Life True.

What makes you excited about work?
Big visions and strong impulses.

What’s your relationship with time like?
Sometimes I have a great time.

What’s your preferred space?
Ocean views, bed views, studio views & warm hearts.

Do you feel a sense of belonging in your field as a creative? How
What is my field? artist, writer, philosopher, dancer, poet, painter, maker, dreamer? Im not sure.

Alexandra Karpilovski is an artist, follow her here.
Photographed by Kimberly Ihre. Alexandra is wearing a jacket by Acne Studios and a dress from By Malene Birger.

Dreams with Cajsa

Do you feel a sense of belonging in your field as a creative? How?
Yes, I do. I’ve studied art and illustration on different levels for almost ten years so I feel pretty confident about being a part of the art world.

What makes you excited about work?
Actually I rarely feel excited about work. Most of the time I have to make lists where I divide my job assignments into smaller tasks and reward myself for every little thing I finish. I usually go about an illustration job like this: first I make quick sketches. Reward myself. Then I work out the sketches in detail. Reward myself. Then I make the drawing very precise and finish the illustration. After that I reward myself for having completed my job. The rewards can be things like an outdoor walk or a cup of tea. Of course I find work really fun sometimes, but it’s not that often I get excited about it.

Where do you turn to online for inspiration?
If I actively look for information I find it easiest on pinterest, but for my daily inspiration i use instagram. I’m following many good illustrators and also different accounts that post design, illustration and photography.

What’s your preferred space?
I really like to spend time at home in my apartment, listening to a good podcast and potter a bit. But I also very much enjoy being in the forest. To be surrounded by trees that are swaying lightly in the breeze and hear the rustle from birds in the bushes. It’s something that makes my inner Lucy feel good.

Who’s visual expression makes you feel overwhelmed?
– I would say nature. It’s amazing how weird a plant can look, covered with thorns or with enormous leaves. And how beautiful the pattern of a butterfly can be, and the colors of the sky. Nothing can ever be as beautiful and inspiring as nature.

What’s the biggest risk of your life?
– 
To take my friends and family for granted and don’t give them all the love and time I want to give them. There’s a risk that I get too involved in my work and prioritize that over a friend that’s need to be comforted, but I don’t want to have it that way.

What’s your relationship with time like?
Pretty stressed, feels like I never have time to do all I should do. Friends I want to meet but haven’t seen in months, emails that I should’ve answered two weeks ago, and always a subway I have to run to.

I wish I had more time to just relax, just lie in bed and watch Netflix with a big cup of tea. And of course I take the time to do that as often as possible, but unfortunately it can make me feel more stressed afterwords over all the things I have left to do.

Credits

Cajsa Wessberg is a model and illustrator, follow her here. Photographed by Kimberly Ihre.
Cajsa is wearing a jacket by Giorgi Rostiashvili

Dreams with Nim Sundström

What do you dream about?
– Being able to support myself solely working as a director and getting budgets that allows me to create what I want.

Who would you love to work with?
– I would love to work with Maceo Frost, I think he has such a beautiful way of telling a story. I truly believe he might be one of Swedens most talented documentary directors.

Who’s visual expression makes you feel overwhelmed?
– All of Romain Gavras work blows me away. He’s one of those directors that refuses to compromise. Most of us has grand ideas but only a rare few pulls them of.

What’s the biggest risk in your life?
– My self-esteem. It’s my frenemy. Part of it makes me work harder and always strive to be better, but it’s a very fine line to destructive insecurity. I really need to get thicker skin when it comes to this. As a young woman striving to work as a director you constantly question yourself. You’re surrounded by media-men that loves to mansplain and put you down.

Where do you turn to online for inspiration?
– Pinterest.
I don’t even know what I would do if I lost my Pinterest account. That’s where I’ve collected photos, people, movies, fashion editorials. Everything that I find that inspires me ends up there.

What’s your relationship with time like?
– Stressing. There’s never enough, I have a really hard time accepting the limited time we have on this earth. But in a sense I guess that’s also the beauty in it.

What makes you excited about work?
– Watching other peoples work and seeing their way of expressing themselves.
It inspires you to do it yourself.

Do you feel a sense of belonging in your field as a creative? How?
– Yeah, I’ve always been sure I want to work in the creative area.
And I’m fortunate enough to have a creative network of friends that all strive to inspire and help each other. So even though being a freelancer can be incredible an lonely job I feel included in something bigger.

Credits

Nim is a director, follow her here. Photographed at her home in Stockholm by Kimberly Ihre.

Silvana Lagos

I go into a tutorial with Mark LeBon and he’s just like, why do you feel you have to tick those boxes?
I was doing my Bachelor in photography and just like at any other examination, you had to fulfill and tick certain boxes of requirement to graduate. I was like What am I doing?, why am I doing this? I wasn’t taking photos anymore, I was doing these installations and looking very much at the interaction and relationship between subject and matter; at the different layers of seeing. At this point I was very much influenced by Nina Power and her “One Dimensional Woman”. She talks about feminism in a very direct way, what feminism is now and how we tear away these layers of each other and again with feminism have started ticking these boxes–you have to be like this or like this. She talks about imagery; how women when photographing women focus on smaller bits and process women as fragments. It is actually kind of a way of breaking down the female gaze.

What am I doing? Why am I doing this?

I feel like I have definitely been influenced, in many ways by the Buffalo scene, I’ve been lucky to have these innovators somehow cross my path in life, whether it has been about being tutored by Mark Lebon during my Bachelor, assisting Mitzi Lorenz and Kate Garner after graduating or having Neneh Cherry in my life. You have to think about what was going on in the 80s in London. A very right wing government led by Margaret Thatcher that didn’t reflect these people’s views, so they decided to basically go fuck it!!, that’s not who we are. They created their own aesthetic, an identity, but more so than that, an attitude. Instead of putting your general supermodel on a front cover they were street casting and using these stunning multiracial kids, putting them on a pedestal and creating this beautiful aesthetic, the photos are all very classically shot in black and white. These people have thankfully somehow influenced me by telling me not to tick boxes, to celebrate the beauty in being multiracial, to see the riches of multiculturalism and not conform to ideas of labeling.
And I feel that somehow my practice reflects that in various layers, whether it is when I do new work or curate others’. I always question and try to understand what brings people together–what cultural and social aspects and what aesthetics create a public. Mostly using sound as the common thread, my work tries to create a new common, a group of people that wouldn’t normally be together. I think the Master’s I did at Konstfack “Art in the Public Realm” was very much about that. For example, in the collaboration I did with Adam Tensta at Tensta Konsthall, where I did a series of workshops with Adam and young local girls, giving them a space to vocalize, the end product was a sound performance. And in the work I did curating at Norberg festival I was trying to join people who don’t come from just a visual arts background, or just a music background.

I am tired of going to places where there isn’t anybody of colour or where I am the only female.

Right now I have a massive problem with that there is hardly any black people reflected in experimental electronic music, it’s just the matter of doing the research. I am tired of going to places where there isn’t anybody of colour or where I am the only female. I kind of see these divisions all the time. I guess in a way I feel like I could always label myself, as a second generation immigrant, as a woman, as a specific social class, but I don’t have these complexes when it comes to gender or class or colour. By all means that’s not to say that I’m not aware of them and that’s not to say that there are times when, whether it be socially or culturally, I have felt the impacts of racism, or the impacts of gender inequality. I just want to break down the divisions, and the bloody boxes we are so comfortable in.

Credits

Photography Hedvig Jenning / Mink MGMT  Fashion Nike Felldin / Hall&Lundgren
Hair & Make up Josefine Scherdin / Mikas Looks
Silvana in top by Giorgi Rostiashvili
Words Dimen Abdulla

More of Silvana here

Lydia Ericsson Wärn

 

Routines are really important to me. I can’t act solely on inspiration or temper, I see the time in the studio as work. Right now I only move between my house, school and work at Carsten Höller. It’s been like this for the past two or three months. I spend a lot of time in school and work really hard to find my way back to a clear sense of a direction.

I was six when I saw the video installation Ever Is Over All. Pipilotti Rist is walking down a street with an axe, smashing car windows. The tension between these naive, romantic colors and an aggressive slow act made me feel sadness, excitement and strength in a way I hadn’t felt before. Those emotions still have a lot to do with each other, in my own work as well. My images are dealing with something aggressive of which I think can be perceived as uncomfortable. I find it really hard to talk about the things I’m doing right now, having just switched from one thing to another. Sometimes you just have to shut up. That kind of integrity in my work is important. I can talk and be very open, but within the process I’m really closed, it’s kind of an infidelity that has to exist in the shade… It’s definitely a kind of relationship. But when I’m done with a series of images I let it go entirely, with no integrity left, and then I’m able to be more rational about it. Then it’s just a love that dies.

For now I’m working on a series of selected family photos. The images usually get cropped a lot. I’ve never been able to relate to a photo without cropping it. I think this kind of reality-edit is interesting. I feel like I’ve just opened the door to a world that I couldn’t live without. It’s very obscure. Obscurities are important to activate the brain and not just walk around and understand but instead really face something and ask: it can be like this, but could it also be like that?  I haven’t painted heads or faces in a long time, I think faces often reveal too much and I hate when an image gets too obvious.

I’ve never been able to relate to a photo without cropping it. I think faces often reveal too much

I’ve always been drawing, so moving on to painting wasn’t a huge step. As a person I’m really fast, I want things to be quick and when painting, I meet resistance. It’s the only time I can really slow down and try to be methodical. I’m really struggling right now, and that kind of challenge inspires me. My feelings about the future are double. It’s scary, you know, this thought of a life as an artist. But it’s also a joyful feeling, like wow, I really love this.

Three defining moments for Lydia Ericsson Wärn

1

The Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin 1986

“Finding Nan Goldins book “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency” in one of my parents bookshelves. I was fourteen and she opened up the world of photography for me. Shortly followed by meeting Cindy Shermans work, she introduced me to the act of dressing up and out to different personas.”

Found here.

2

“My first time going to a club: I was fifteen and with my other half Mi. We were dressed up to our teeth and went to Berns in Stockholm. I remember thinking “wow this is really a kindergarden for grown ups”, I loved it, and still do. Dancing to good music is a great source of happiness for me.

 

3

Death in Venice 1971

“Seing the film Death in Venice for the first time as a kid. The novel and film takes place at Lido, Venice. Funny that I later on has spent a lot of time there. I revisited Lido recently in September, it holds a special place in my heart.”

Found here.

Credits

Photography Hedvig Jenning / Mink MGMT  Fashion Nike Felldin / Hall&Lundgren
Hair & Make up Josefine Scherdin / Mikas Looks
Lydia is dressed in BACK
Words Dimen Abdulla